Events

Events

SundayMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFridaySaturday
 
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Candlemas

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St. Blaise Fea...

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Adoration

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All Night Ador...

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Adoration

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Ash Wednesday

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Adoration

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Stations of th...

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Reverse Raffle...

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Italian Statio...

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Adoration

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Stations of th...

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Tuesday Feb 2, 2021

  • Candlemas

    Tuesday Feb 2, 2021 All day


    February 2nd is the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord,


    also known as Candlemas.


    Blessed Candles will be available at each Mass.


    Mass times are:


    6:30 am


    6:00 pm


    February 2 is exactly forty days after December 25, the nativity of Jesus. Jewish law (Ex 13:2, 12) dictated that Jesus, as the firstborn, be consecrated to God. This was done by the parents as they presented their Son in the Temple.


    Jewish law further specified (Lv 12:2-8) that a mother was ritually impure after giving birth, and that she had to wait a set period of time (forty days for a boy) before she was to offer a sacrifice to the Lord for purification.


    The convergence of these two Jewish regulations occasions Luke’s account of both the Presentation of the Lord and the Purification of Mary. These days the liturgical emphasis is more on the Presentation of Jesus. Luke highlights the role of Simeon and Anna, two righteous Jews who recognized Jesus as the long-awaited Messiah and praised God for being able to see and experience such a marvel in their lifetimes.


    Simeon’s prayer concerning the special role of Jesus states that Jesus is “a light for revelation to the Gentiles.” This phrase eventually originated the custom of blessing candles on this day which were to be used in the ceremonies, rituals, and processions throughout the church year. Thus February 2 is also known as Candlemas Day. This day is indeed a rich feast to be savored.


    ©LPi

Wednesday Feb 3, 2021

  • St. Blaise Feast

    Wednesday Feb 3, 2021 All day

    February 3rd is the Feast of St Blaise, Bishop & Martyr.


    We will have Blessing of the Throats at each Mass:


    * 6:30 am


    * 6:00 pm



    In addition, there will be Blessing of the Throats at each Mass on Sunday, February 7th. 


    Sunday Masses are at:


    8:00 am


    10:00 am (Italian)


    11:30 am


    5:00 pm

Thursday Feb 4, 2021

  • Adoration

    Thursday Feb 4, 2021 3:00 PM to 5:45 PM

Friday Feb 5, 2021

  • All Night Adoration First Friday

    Friday Feb 5, 2021 All day


    Join us every First Friday for 10:00 pm Mass followed by All-Night Adoration.  Benediction is at 8:00 am followed by Mass & Saturday Salve at 8:15 am. 


     

Thursday Feb 11, 2021

  • Adoration

    Thursday Feb 11, 2021 3:00 PM to 5:45 PM

Wednesday Feb 17, 2021

  • Ash Wednesday

    Wednesday Feb 17, 2021 All day

    ASH WEDNESDAY


    Masses are 6:30 AM, 8:15 AM, and 6:00 PM.  Ashes will be distributed at all Masses.


     

Thursday Feb 18, 2021

  • Adoration

    Thursday Feb 18, 2021 3:00 PM to 5:45 PM

Friday Feb 19, 2021

  • Stations of the Cross

    Friday Feb 19, 2021 6:30 PM to 7:00 PM

    Please join us for Stations of the Cross each Friday during Lent after the 6:00 pm Mass.  



    The first Stations of the Cross were walked by Jesus himself on the way to Calvary. Known as the "Via Dolorosa" ("The Way of Suffering") or the "Via Crucis" ("The Way of the Cross"), it was marked out from the earliest times and was a traditional walk for pilgrims who came to Jerusalem. The early Christians in Jerusalem would walk the same pathway that Jesus walked, pausing for reflection and prayer. Later, when Christians could not travel to the Holy Land, artistic depictions of "The Way of the Cross" were set up in churches, or outside and Christians would walk from station to station, reading the Gospel account of the Passion, or simply praying and reflecting on each event. While the content or place of each station had changed, the intention was to make a mini-pilgrimage and follow--literally--in the footsteps of Jesus.


    This devotion became better known in the Middle Ages, and the Franciscans are credited with its spread. Lent is a time when many people make the Stations and some churches present Passion plays or Living Stations. But anyone can pray the Stations at any time. It is a simple and personal reflection on the passion of Jesus and what it means to us.


    ©LPi

Sunday Feb 21, 2021

  • Reverse Raffle Begins

    Sunday Feb 21, 2021 All day

Monday Feb 22, 2021

  • Italian Stations of the Cross

    Monday Feb 22, 2021 6:30 PM to 7:00 PM

    Join us for Stations of the Cross in Italian each Monday during Lent after the 6:00 pm Mass (in English).

Thursday Feb 25, 2021

  • Adoration

    Thursday Feb 25, 2021 3:00 PM to 5:45 PM

Friday Feb 26, 2021

  • Stations of the Cross

    Friday Feb 26, 2021 6:30 PM to 7:00 PM

    Please join us for Stations of the Cross each Friday during Lent after the 6:00 pm Mass.  



    The first Stations of the Cross were walked by Jesus himself on the way to Calvary. Known as the "Via Dolorosa" ("The Way of Suffering") or the "Via Crucis" ("The Way of the Cross"), it was marked out from the earliest times and was a traditional walk for pilgrims who came to Jerusalem. The early Christians in Jerusalem would walk the same pathway that Jesus walked, pausing for reflection and prayer. Later, when Christians could not travel to the Holy Land, artistic depictions of "The Way of the Cross" were set up in churches, or outside and Christians would walk from station to station, reading the Gospel account of the Passion, or simply praying and reflecting on each event. While the content or place of each station had changed, the intention was to make a mini-pilgrimage and follow--literally--in the footsteps of Jesus.


    This devotion became better known in the Middle Ages, and the Franciscans are credited with its spread. Lent is a time when many people make the Stations and some churches present Passion plays or Living Stations. But anyone can pray the Stations at any time. It is a simple and personal reflection on the passion of Jesus and what it means to us.


    ©LPi